fromelf User Guide: --bincombined - Keil

Fast Flood Fill Lighting in a Blocky Voxel Game: Pt 1.

Hey guys!
It has been a long time since my last blog post, and I figured that a good topic to talk about would be volumetric voxel based lighting for minecraft-like games! Resources seem to be a bit sparse on the subject, particularly relating to colored light, which will be covered in part 2. I'll try to finish part two within the next week and will post it here.
I will paste the blog here but I recommend using the FULL BLOG POST LINK since the formatting will be a lot better... also pictures!
Introduction:
So you have a basic blocky voxel engine, and you want to implement lighting. The easy route would be to use standard deferred dynamic lighting like in most other games. However, dynamic lighting has a few issues.
  1. You need to shadow map every light to prevent light from bleeding through your voxels.
  2. Light will not radiate around corners without expensive global illumination, which can be a bit unrealistic in small undergound tunnels with many winding passages.
  3. The more lights in the scene you have, the slower the game will run. Though this is greatly alleviated with deferred rendering.
Now these issues might not really be that relevant to your game, but they are in Seed Of Andromeda. Luckily, there is an alternative! We can store light as voxel data, and propagate it through the grid. This allows light to radiate around corners, and since the lighting is baked into the mesh, increasing the number of lights will minimally affect performance. We can also easily find the light level at a given point by simply sampling the voxel grid, which can be useful if we want voxel plants to be able to grow when exposed to sunlight. However, there are some issues with voxel lighting as well.
  1. Voxel lighting requires you to manually propagate the light. I will show you how to do it quickly, but it is still more expensive than simply placing a dynamic light. This calculation only needs to be done when adding or removing a light, or when modifying blocks around a light.
  2. The maximum range of your voxel lighting is limited by how much voxel data you allocate for it. If you allocate 5 bits for it, then the maximum range of any light is 25=32 blocks from the source.
  3. The shape of the resulting light volume is not perfectly spherical, it is actually the shape of an octahedron.
If the cons of voxel lighting outweight the cons of dynamic lighting, you might want to go with dynamic lighting, or maybe even a combination of the two. Otherwise, I will show you the workings of voxel lighting.
Constraints:
For this tutorial I will be assuming a few things.
  1. Your world is made up of cubic chunks of size 323. All voxel data is stored in flat arrays per chunk. If this is not the case, modify accordingly.
  2. You want sunlight to propagate downward from the top of your voxel world, until it hits something.
  3. You want lamps/torches that emit voxel light that is independent of the sunlight.
Any example code will be provided in C++.
The Data
In order to correctly propagate and update the light, we need to store the light levels of each block. To do that we will use a 3d lightmap, which is just a 3d array. Now the maximum light level will depend entirely on your engine. Minecraft uses light levels of 0-15. I use 0-31 since my voxels are half as large. So for now I will assume you will be using levels 0-15, which can be stored in 4 bits.
Since we need to store both sunlight and torchlight seperately, we will need 2 lightmaps. However, since sunlight and torchlight only need 4 bits per voxel each, we can combine them into a single 8 bit byte. Therefore we only need a single lightMap of bytes. (This is not true if we want to use colored light. See the colored light section below for more details)
unsigned char lightMap[chunkWidth][chunkWidth][chunkWidth]; //chunkWidth == 32 
Getting and setting light and sunlight are done using bitwise operations, since we need to mask out 4 bits of the byte in each case. Lets say that the most significant 4 bits are sunlight, and the least significant are voxel light. We can get and set the light values using these fast inline functions. Remember, 0xF is 15, which is 00001111 in binary. 0xF0 is 11110000.
// Get the bits XXXX0000 inline int Chunk::getSunlight(int x, int y, int z) { return (lightMap[y][z][x] >> 4) & 0xF; } // Set the bits XXXX0000 inline void Chunk::setSunlight(int x, int y, int z, int val) { lightMap[y][z][x] = (lightMap[x][y][z] & 0xF) | (val << 4); } // Get the bits 0000XXXX inline int Chunk::getTorchlight(int x, int y, int z) { return lightMap[y][z][x] & 0xF; } // Set the bits 0000XXXX inline void Chunk::setTorchlight(int x, int y, int z, int val) { lightMap[y][z][x] = (lightMap[x][y][z] & 0xF0) | val; } 
Notice that I am calling lightMap[y][z][x]. This is a matter of personal preference, you can store the data in whatever order you wish. This is the cache friendly way to do it if you want to iterate your chunk like this
for (int y = 0; y < chunkWidth; y++) { for (int z = 0; z < chunkWidth; z++) { for (int x = 0; x < chunkWidth; x++) { //... 
NOTE: If you would like to, you could just store two separate lightmaps. You will double your RAM usage, but you could use the extra 4 bits for something else. If you want to also store light color, you could use more data and store color channels.
When we first initialize our chunks, we should be sure to zero out the lightmap. In c++ this can be done quite quickly with.
memset(lightMap, 0, sizeof(lightMap)); 
The Propagation Algorithm
Ok we have our storage! Now what? Well lets start with torchlight. If the player places a torch on a block, we might call chunk.setSunlight(x, y, z, 14). But now we need to spread the light outwards in each direction, reducing the light level by 1 at each block until we are at zero. Check out the image below, that I shamelessly stole from minecraft.gamepedia.
https://www.seedofandromeda.com/assets/images/blogs/TorchlightDistance.jpg
In this image, a yellow T box is a torch, and each torch has a light level of 14. As you can see, light level decreases by 1 for each cell that you move away from a torch. Notice that along the green diagonal, light level decreases by two instead of one. This is because distance from the light is calculated as X distance + Y distance, instead of a true linear distance calculation. Keep in mind this is happening in 3D, which the image does not illustrate.
So how do we design an algorithm that does this? Well a naive solution that I see people coming up with is that you do 15 light passes (one for each level) to spread the light. Each pass, you iterate every block in the chunk and when you hit a block with light you spread it to a neighbouring spot. After 15 passes you are guaranteed to have spread out the light correctly! Sounds good right? NO!
That is WAY to much iteration. We only want to visit each voxel that the light touches ONE time! And we dont want to visit any voxels that are unaffected! For this, we need Breadth-First Search (BFS).
The BFS algorithm is perfect for this job. And it is incredibly simple to implement! All we need is a FIFO queue of nodes. For instance:
std::queue  lightBfsQueue. 
Lets define a LightNode as follows.
struct LightNode { LightNode(short indx, Chunk* ch) : index(indx), chunk(ch) {} short index; //this is the x y z coordinate! Chunk* chunk; //pointer to the chunk that owns it! } 
Constructor in a struct? I'm so bad...
Notice that instead of storing x, y, and z, we store a single value index. This is to keep our node class super tiny. The smaller it is, the more cache friendly it is, and the better our algorithm will perform. To get an index from x, y, and z you do the following. ( Remember, I store them in (y,z,x) order )
Node.index = y * chunkWidth * chunkWidth + z * chunkWidth + x; 
The Algorithm
So lets look at the BFS algorithm for our lighting.
When placing a torch with light level L we do the following: Step 1: Call setTorchlight to set the light.
 chunk->setTorchlight(x, y, z, L); Step 2: Add a new node for the torch to the bfsQueue. short index = y * chunkWidth * chunkWidth + z * chunkWidth + x; lightBfsQueue.emplace(index, chunk) Step 3: Repeat the following steps until bfsQueue is empty. while(lightBfsQueue.empty() == false) { Step 4: Take the front node off of the queue. // Get a reference to the front node. LightNode &node = lightBfsQueue.front(); int index = node.index; Chunk* chunk = node.chunk; // Pop the front node off the queue. We no longer need the node reference lightBfsQueue.pop(); // Extract x, y, and z from our chunk. // Depending on how you access data in your chunk, this may be optional int x = index % chunkWidth; int y = index / (chunkWidth * chunkWidth); int z = (index % (chunkWidth * chunkWidth) ) / chunkWidth; // Grab the light level of the current node int lightLevel = chunk->getTorchlight(x, y, z); Step 5: Look at all neighbouring voxels to that node. if their light level is 2 or more levels less than the current node, then set their light level to the current nodes light level - 1, and then add them to the queue. // NOTE: You will need to do bounds checking! // If you are on the edge of a chunk, then x - 1 will be -1. Instead // you need to look at your left neighboring chunk and check the // adjacent block there. When you do that, be sure to use the // neighbor chunk when emplacing the new node to lightBfsQueue; // Check negative X neighbor // Make sure you don't propagate light into opaque blocks like stone! if (chunk->getBlock(x - 1, y, z).opaque == false && chunk->getTorchlight(x - 1, y, z) + 2 <= lightLevel) { // Set its light level chunk->setTorchlight(x - 1, y, z, lightLevel - 1); // Construct index short index = y * chunkWidth * chunkWidth + z * chunkWidth + (x - 1); // Emplace new node to queue. (could use push as well) lightBfsQueue.emplace(index, chunk); } // Check other five neighbors ... } //End while loop 
The end! Its only 5 steps, and the actual loop is only 2 steps! Not that bad at all! Light Removal
Well we have light propagation figured out, but what happens when we want to delete a light? We simple do BFS again! This just requires modification to the spreading algorithm.
We need a new node definition, and a new queue to prevent duplicate node updates with this algorithm
std::queue  lightRemovalBfsQueue. struct LightRemovalNode { LightNode(short indx, short v, Chunk* ch) : index(indx), val(v), chunk(ch) {} short index; //this is the x y z coordinate! short val; Chunk* chunk; //pointer to the chunk that owns it! } Step 1: Add a new node for the torch to the bfsQueue, and set light to zero short val = (short)chunk->getTorchlight(x, y, z); short index = y * chunkWidth * chunkWidth + z * chunkWidth + x; lightRemovalBfsQueue.emplace(index, val, chunk); chunk->setTorchlight(x, y, z, 0); Step 2: Repeat the following steps until bfsQueue is empty. while(lightRemovalBfsQueue.empty() == false) { Step 3: Take the front node off of the queue // Get a reference to the front node LightRemovalNode &node = lightRemovalBfsQueue.front(); int index = (int)node.index; int lightLevel = (int)node.val; Chunk* chunk = node.chunk; // Pop the front node off the queue. lightRemovalBfsQueue.pop(); // Extract x, y, and z from our chunk. Same as before. ... Step 4: Look at all neighbouring voxels to that node. if their light level is nonzero and is less than the current node, then add them to the queue and set their light level to zero. Else if it is >= current node, then add it to the light propagation queue. // NOTE: Don't forget chunk bounds checking! I didn't show it here. // Check negative X neighbor int neighborLevel = currentNode.chunk->getTorchlight(x - 1, y, z); if (neighborLevel != 0 && neighborLevel < lightLevel) { // Set its light level currentNode.chunk->setTorchlight(x - 1, y, z, 0); // Construct index short index = y * chunkWidth * chunkWidth + z * chunkWidth + (x - 1); // Emplace new node to queue. (could use push as well) lightRemovalBfsQueue.emplace(index, neighborLevel, chunk); } else if (neighborLevel >= lightLevel) { short index = y * chunkWidth * chunkWidth + z * chunkWidth + (x - 1); // Add it to the update queue, so it can propagate to fill in the gaps // left behind by this removal. We should update the lightBfsQueue after // the lightRemovalBfsQueue is empty. lightBfsQueue.emplace(index, chunk); } // Check other five neighbors ... } //End while loop 
Notice that in step 4 we added an else if that checks to see if the neighbor light is >= the current nodes light. If it is, then we will propagate this light witht he first BFS algorithm, by pushing it onto lightBfsQueue and updating it after we are done with all the light removal updates. This is so that if you have two lights next to each other, removing one light will allow the other light to fill in the empty spaces left behind.
Conclusion
Now you know the basics of voxel light propagation! If you have any questions, use the comments below or send me a PM! In the next part we will cover sunlight and colored voxel light!
Link to part 2
submitted by DubstepCoder to gamedev [link] [comments]

Compiling for AMD processor from Intel processor, what am I missing?

I am trying to compile my source on a machine with an Intel core-i7 processor to run the binary on a server with opteron processors using the Clang compiler. I use march=opteron when compiling and as the code is computationally expensive I use -O3. Because I can not install shared libraries on the server I statically link the binary using -static. When I run the binary on the server it states "Illegal Instruction" and terminates. Using Valgrind I get the following information:
vex amd64->IR: unhandled instruction bytes: 0xC5 0xF8 0x77 0xC3 0x66 0xF 0x1F 0x44 vex amd64->IR: REX=0 REX.W=0 REX.R=0 REX.X=0 REX.B=0 vex amd64->IR: VEX=0 VEX.L=0 VEX.nVVVV=0x0 ESC=NONE vex amd64->IR: PFX.66=0 PFX.F2=0 PFX.F3=0 ==39137== valgrind: Unrecognised instruction at address 0x555056.
Which by googling suggests that the binary contains an SSE instruction that is not present on the opteron processor.
My questions are:
  1. Why is Clang producing a binary that contains instructions not present in the architecture I am telling it to compile for?
  2. Is the optimization overriding the architecture option I am giving the compiler? I thought it would try to optimize subject to which instructions are available.
  3. What can I do to fix this problem?
Thanks in advance, I look forward to hearing where I have gone wrong!
submitted by Insight_ to cpp_questions [link] [comments]

[Help] iGPU + Radeon, triple-mon configuration

Hello /archlinux. I have recently got into Arch Linux but struggling to have 3rd monitor to work. I'm currently running Antergos (Cinnamon LightDM) installation, I have googling for hours looking for solution.
 
[[email protected] binary]# lspci | grep -E 'Display|VGA' 00:02.0 Display controller: Intel Corporation Xeon E3-1200 v3/4th Gen Core Processor Integrated Graphics Controller (rev 06) 01:00.0 VGA compatible controller: Advanced Micro Devices, Inc. [AMD/ATI] Tahiti XT [Radeon HD 7970/8970 OEM / R9 280X] 
 
Method 1 - PRIME:
Many suggested to use PRIME, but it does not work as my iGPU VGA will stuck in tty1 console login. Oddly enough, running command below under Antergos Gnome will work, it will refresh the screen connect my iGPU VGA as 3rd monitor with DE.
[[email protected] binary]# xrandr --listproviders Providers: number : 2 Provider 0: id: 0xb0 cap: 0xf, Source Output, Sink Output, Source Offload, Sink Offload crtcs: 6 outputs: 4 associated providers: 1 name:radeon Provider 1: id: 0x47 cap: 0xb, Source Output, Sink Output, Sink Offload crtcs: 4 outputs: 4 associated providers: 1 name:Intel xrandr --setprovideroutputsource 1 0 xrandr --output DVI-0 --mode 1920x1200 xrandr --output DVI-1 --mode 1920x1080 --right-of DVI-0 --pos 0x120 xrandr --output VGA1 --right-of DVI-1 --pos 0x176 
xrandr log after command above
 
Method 2 - xorg.conf:
I have also tried to configure a 10-monitor.conf under /etc/X11/xorg.conf.d/ (Note that my xorg.conf are all base file from installation). Unfortunately this method does not work for me either, Cinnamon crash after login GUI and refuse to render anything on iGPU (Black screen).
Section "Device" Identifier "GPU Intel Haswell IGP" Driver "intel" BusID "PCI:0:2:0" EndSection Section "Device" Identifier "GPU AMD Radeon R9 280X" Driver "radeon" BusID "PCI:1:0:0" EndSection Section "Monitor" Identifier "Monitor HP w2408h" Option "PreferredMode" "1920x1200" Option "Position" "0 0" EndSection Section "Monitor" Identifier "Monitor Acer H233H" Option "Primary" "true" Option "PreferredMode" "1920x1080" Option "Position" "1920 120" EndSection Section "Monitor" Identifier "Monitor HP vs17e" Option "PreferredMode" "1280x1024" Option "Position" "3840 176" EndSection Section "Screen" Identifier "Screen HP w2408h" Device "GPU AMD Radeon R9 280X" Monitor "Monitor HP w2408h" EndSection Section "Screen" Identifier "Screen Acer H233H" Device "GPU AMD Radeon R9 280X" Monitor "Monitor Acer H233H" EndSection Section "Screen" Identifier "Screen HP vs17e" Device "GPU Intel Haswell IGP" Monitor "Monitor HP vs17e" EndSection Section "ServerLayout" Identifier "Main Layout" Screen 0 "Screen HP w2408h" Screen 1 "Screen Acer H233H" RightOf "Screen HP w2408h" Screen 2 "Screen HP vs17e" RightOf "Screen Acer H233H" EndSection 
Resulting only 1 GPU being used in xrandr
[[email protected] binary]# xrandr --listproviders Providers: number : 1 Provider 0: id: 0xb0 cap: 0xf, Source Output, Sink Output, Source Offload, Sink Offload crtcs: 6 outputs: 4 associated providers: 1 name:radeon 
Sorry for a long post, and I can't seem to find sidebar rules whether can I ask question here. Thanks in advance /archlinux.
submitted by Welcome-2-Reddit to archlinux [link] [comments]

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